Deployment

CRES Issue Priorities 

To measure successful climate action, we must look at global emissions. Thanks largely to cutting-edge innovation, investment to increase the U.S. carbon advantage, and a commitment to clean energy technologies, the United States leads the world in emissions reductions. But there is still work to be done. CRES’ mission is to engage as many U.S. policymakers and the public to embrace an all-of-the-above energy approach, which would strengthen America’s leadership, boost local economies, secure strong domestic supply chains, and protect our planet.  

Deployment

Deployment of new technologies and infrastructure is critical to continued reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and access to affordable energy. To ensure America’s continued leadership in lowering emissions, we must remove barriers to access resources, build energy infrastructure, and deploy new clean energy technologies.

Modernizing regulations, streamlining processes, and reducing costs while maintaining environmental integrity will accelerate the pace of infrastructure development and domestic resource production, resulting in economic gains for America and reduced global emissions.

The future of a secure, reliable, and resilient grid will rely heavily on expanded energy storage, smart-grid infrastructure, and new transmission that combined will allow for a seamless integration of all sources of energy.

Homegrown American energy and the development of clean energy technologies rely on timely, responsible access to federal lands and waters.

May 19, 2024
Introduction Hydrogen has been dubbed the “Swiss army knife” of clean energy, given its potential to become a tool to cut emissions in key sectors, as well as to assert U.S. global energy leadership and increase our nation’s competitive edge. Given its unique attributes, it has the potential to greatly reduce emissions in hard-to-decarbonize industrial […]

April 17, 2024
The Clean Economy Tracker, developed by Utah State University and Atlas Public Policy, is a game-changer for policy wonks, clean energy advocates and citizens seeking to monitor the impact of the most recent investments in clean energy projects. It provides a comprehensive look at public and private clean energy investments across the United States. Key […]

March 21, 2024
Introduction Section 45X of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) provides an advanced manufacturing production credit to domestic manufacturers of applicable clean energy components. Currently, the United States relies heavily on foreign manufacturers for these components and resources, including adversarial countries like Russia and China. Establishing a robust domestic supply chain requires reducing U.S. dependence on […]

March 13, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

February 8, 2024
Introduction Hydrogen has been dubbed the “Swiss army knife” of clean energy, given its potential to become a tool to cut emissions in key sectors, as well as to assert U.S. global energy leadership and increase our nation’s competitive edge. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), switching to low-emissions hydrogen in hard-to-abate sectors […]

February 5, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

January 29, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

January 24, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

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