American Competitiveness

CRES Issue Priorities 

To measure successful climate action, we must look at global emissions. Thanks largely to cutting-edge innovation, investment to increase the U.S. carbon advantage, and a commitment to clean energy technologies, the United States leads the world in emissions reductions. But there is still work to be done. CRES’ mission is to engage as many U.S. policymakers and the public to embrace an all-of-the-above energy approach, which would strengthen America’s leadership, boost local economies, secure strong domestic supply chains, and protect our planet.  

American Competitiveness

While the United States is leading the world in emissions reductions, China’s and developing nation’s emissions continue to rise. By increasing American energy production and implementing an all-of-the-above energy approach, the U.S. will continue to not only be a global leader in reducing emissions, but also provide goods and energy for the rest of world, support economic growth and enhance security for America and our allies.

Current low-carbon energy sources, including renewable resources and nuclear energy, are on track to account for one-fourth of American energy production. As these and emerging innovative technologies, such as carbon capture, continue to be developed, the U.S. should continue to develop all other domestic energy resources, to meet both domestic and global energy demands. Doing so will increase our energy security and also help to reduce global emissions, as the US is among the world’s most carbon efficient producers.

Reducing American reliance on adversarial nations by developing more secure domestic supply chains, including for the materials needed to produce clean energy technologies, is critical to reduce global emissions, advance national security and achieve domestic manufacturing goals.

U.S. industry is at the forefront of deploying innovative technologies to reduce hard –to-abate emissions while securing strong domestic supply chains, creating American jobs, and contributing to local economies.

Policies that strengthen the global competitiveness of carbon efficient producers, such as the United States, will reduce global emissions. Capitalizing on America’s carbon advantage requires reliable metrics and measurements.

Continued over-reliance on geopolitical rivals for our energy supply chain has exposed the US to growing risk and economic vulnerability. Developing the critical minerals and resources needed for our energy needs, including clean energy technologies (EV batteries, solar panels, wind turbines, nuclear reactors, and more), in the United States is safer, cleaner, and more ethical.

May 23, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

May 13, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

April 22, 2024
Introduction Geothermal energy is the process by which naturally occurring steam and hot water are used to generate zero-emission energy, at both small- and utility-scale. Current technology drills wells deep into the Earth to harness geothermal resources for use aboveground. While geothermal is currently only four percent of the United States’ electricity production, a recent […]

March 27, 2024
Background On January 26, the Biden Administration announced a de facto ban on pending decisions for exports of liquified natural gas (LNG) to non-Free Trade Agreement (FTA) countries, until the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) updates the underlying analyses for authorizations.  The announcement sparked extensive global debate and for good reason. The lack of clear […]

March 25, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

February 5, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

January 23, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

January 19, 2024
The United States' energy security has changed dramatically since U.S. imports peaked in 2007. As the U.S. continues to decarbonize and work towards net zero, many questions must be answered: At what pace and scale will the U.S. need to deploy clean energy technologies to achieve net zero emissions?

Scroll to Top